The fault in our stars

Did I ever mention that I love writing? I do. This time, though, the words just won’t form any sort of pattern. I know more or less what I want to say, about this book. It was several months since I first read it (several hours since I re-read some parts) and I want to write something about it. But I can’t do it justice. I can’t even make it one piece. Therefor, I shall now try I whole new way of writing a book reviews: letting loose my part-done scribbles.

I think it was only a matter of time before I had to read The fault in our stars by John Green. I’ve had it recommended many times, but I thought it would be a depressing story, cry-your-heart-out-and-decide-to-do-good type of story. It could have been.

I hate and love this book.

I love Hazel. She is prodigiously sophisticated and incredibly smart – one of the rare teens who prefer reading poetry to writing it, as her friend so elegantly put it.

Does that mean she can’t watch shitty TV and wear comfortable clothes? No. She manages somehow to combine an intelligent sense of humor with a “teen” way of talking – how cool isn’t that? I say talking, because that is how the book is written: a long, embellished monologue.

Most important is her rare ability to laugh at her own misery and anything else that comes along. Really, that is what makes the book bearable to read.

Being younger than her I’m probably not entitled to call her “beyond her years” but if I am, Hazel Grace is just that.

Better yet (not better, but good), she is not the only fantastic person in the story. Surrounded by Augustus Waters (too good to be true).

Whyyyy doesn’t An imperial affliction exist?

And for the things I hate? Cancer. Two teenagers with cancer fall in love, neither of them know how long they have left. That’s bound to be a tragic story, and it is.

The outline is indeed sad; Two teenagers with cancer fall in love, neither of them know how long they will live. That’s bound to be a tragic story, and it is. Many times reading it I cried. But there’s more to it. Somehow, this tragic story is funny. Hazel Grace has the rare ability to laugh at her own misery. She is smart, in a way she is the person  i wawnt tp be

But there’s so much more to it. I

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One response to “The fault in our stars

  1. Pingback: Looking for Alaska & Paper towns | Dancing Drafts

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